Why Not to Give Pets as Presents

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In heartfelt rom-com movies, there are often scenes of a child or a love interest receiving a puppy or cat as a gift. In theory, giving a pet as a gift might sound like a cute idea for someone, but one should consider the many responsibilities the receiver will have that will last a lifetime.

The ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) recognizes that it is a common tradition to give a pet as a gift for momentous occasions, such as Christmas, graduations, or birthdays.

Due to this common gift choice, the ASPCA has a few recommendations for those who are thinking of giving a pet as a gift, such as only giving a pet to those who express a great interest in wanting one and someone who is a teenager or older. Another point to acknowledge is someone’s schedule, to make sure they would be able to have the time to take care of a pet and to know if they are financially able, as well.

“I definitely don’t like the idea of giving pets as presents unless the person really wants one. Pets are living creatures with feelings, not inanimate objects,” agrees Katie Huettel, special education major.

Healthy Pets also mention some other thoughts to consider before getting a pet as a present, such as the weather, chaos of the holidays, not teaching children the seriousness of a pet, and contributing to mass pet selling corporations.

The weather during Christmas time is usually cold, and this can pose an issue when getting a new pet due to them having to be potty-trained outside. Pets normally are not pleased to be outside in such low temperatures, making the training harder for the owners and pets.

Holidays are cram packed for families due to shopping, cooking, hectic schedules, and guests in the house. New pets need to be introduced gently, and it would be better if they did not come into such a stressful environment.

If a child receives a pet as a present, he or she often associates the pet as a toy. They should not view a pet the same way they would view a new bike, adds Healthy Pets. The online pet advice article also mentions that it is a good idea to separate the pet and presents and to take the opportunity to teach the child responsibility of a living being.

Amy Quintero, criminal justice major, adds, “I feel like pets should not be given as a Christmas present because they are not objects and the recipients most likely don’t know the responsibilities that come with it. Maybe if they are given to older people that fully know what to do, but they’re most likely going to be given to children which is a bad idea.”

Healthy Pets also says that if one does give a pet as a present, they should highly consider rescuing a four-legged friend. Many businesses receive their puppies from puppy mills, and

many are unhealthy due to being bred in such poor and filthy conditions. People also need to know that breeders are not always reliable due to there being many irresponsible breeders that provide the same living conditions of puppy mills; puppy mills have a mother dog that keeps having litter after litter and then when too weak or old to continue to have puppies, they are disposed of.

When a pet is purchased from a business or breeder, this encourages them to keep selling and is giving them the money to stay in business.

In the end, people who are considering giving someone a pet as a present should consider the gift receiver’s lifestyle and maturity. A pet is a lot of responsibility, money, and is time-consuming. The choice to get a pet should not be taken lightly, as they are a lifetime commitment.

In heartfelt rom-com movies, there are often scenes of a child or a love interest receiving a puppy or cat as a gift. In theory, giving a pet as a gift might sound like a cute idea for someone, but one should consider the many responsibilities the receiver will have that will last a lifetime.

The ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) recognizes that it is a common tradition to give a pet as a gift for momentous occasions, such as Christmas, graduations, or birthdays.

Due to this common gift choice, the ASPCA has a few recommendations for those who are thinking of giving a pet as a gift, such as only giving a pet to those who express a great interest in wanting one and someone who is a teenager or older. Another point to acknowledge is someone’s schedule, to make sure they would be able to have the time to take care of a pet and to know if they are financially able, as well.

“I definitely don’t like the idea of giving pets as presents unless the person really wants one. Pets are living creatures with feelings, not inanimate objects,” agrees Katie Huettel, special education major.

Healthy Pets also mention some other thoughts to consider before getting a pet as a present, such as the weather, chaos of the holidays, not teaching children the seriousness of a pet, and contributing to mass pet selling corporations.

The weather during Christmas time is usually cold, and this can pose an issue when getting a new pet due to them having to be potty-trained outside. Pets normally are not pleased to be outside in such low temperatures, making the training harder for the owners and pets.

Holidays are cram packed for families due to shopping, cooking, hectic schedules, and guests in the house. New pets need to be introduced gently, and it would be better if they did not come into such a stressful environment.

If a child receives a pet as a present, he or she often associates the pet as a toy. They should not view a pet the same way they would view a new bike, adds Healthy Pets. The online pet advice article also mentions that it is a good idea to separate the pet and presents and to take the opportunity to teach the child responsibility of a living being.

Amy Quintero, criminal justice major, adds, “I feel like pets should not be given as a Christmas present because they are not objects and the recipients most likely don’t know the responsibilities that come with it. Maybe if they are given to older people that fully know what to do, but they’re most likely going to be given to children which is a bad idea.”

Healthy Pets also says that if one does give a pet as a present, they should highly consider rescuing a four-legged friend. Many businesses receive their puppies from puppy mills, and

many are unhealthy due to being bred in such poor and filthy conditions. People also need to know that breeders are not always reliable due to there being many irresponsible breeders that provide the same living conditions of puppy mills; puppy mills have a mother dog that keeps having litter after litter and then when too weak or old to continue to have puppies, they are disposed of.

When a pet is purchased from a business or breeder, this encourages them to keep selling and is giving them the money to stay in business.

In the end, people who are considering giving someone a pet as a present should consider the gift receiver’s lifestyle and maturity. A pet is a lot of responsibility, money, and is time-consuming. The choice to get a pet should not be taken lightly, as they are a lifetime commitment.

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